Tagged: Reproductive Health

What’s so Good About Natural Birth?

“Natural birth has become an endangered species…and we need to save it, and we need to save it because our future physical, emotional and mental well-being of our culture depends on it”

Sarah Buckley, MD, Author of  ‘Gentle Birth, Gentle Mothering’

‘We may end up in a society where we have weakened the Oxytocin system. That might mean that people become less interactive, less friendly and more stressed’

Kerstin Uvnäs Moberg, MD & Professor in Physiology, Author of, ‘The Oxytocin Factor’

Pretty convincing reasons why natural birth is not just important for the Mother, but for society as a whole.

Quotes taken from the ‘One World Birth’ trailer. Click here to check out their website

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Pregnancy Myth Buster

During pregnancy it is not uncommon to find yourself as a human magnet. You will find that without realizing it, you have entered in to a new ‘members only’ club. Women of all ages will smile at you in the street, random people will stare at your belly in awe, doors will be held open for you, and total strangers will feel the need to put their hands on your bump. People love to tell you all sorts of things when you are pregnant. They will relish in telling you the joys, the horrors, the hells, the triumphs of their pregnancy and birth experiences. People will tell you ‘you should never do this’, and ‘definitely do that’, whether you ask for their opinion or not! You will hear things from your mother, your mother in law, your aunty, your cousin, your best friend, your boss’s wife, the elderly lady down the street, people on the bus, mom’s in the park, and it is likely that they are all saying completely different things. All this advice can become overwhelming and confusing, and is often not based on anything more than old wives tales. So I wanted to set a couple of common pregnancy myths straight.

The common pregnancy myth about ‘eating for two’, is just that-a myth. Although you want to nourish yourself during your pregnancy, you do not want to over eat. In reality, we only require an additional 100 calories in the first trimester, and 300 extra calories during the second and third, which when you think about it really isn’t a lot. During pregnancy your body becomes more efficient at absorbing nutrients from the foods you eat. Eating twice as much does not double your chances of having a healthy baby. Have you ever wondered why pregnant women are so prone to constipation? Unfortunately, constipation affects approximately half of all women at some point during their pregnancy. Although it may be annoying, it does have its purpose. The passage of food through the gut is slowed down due to the effects of pregnancy hormones progesterone and relaxin. The hormones relax the muscles of the intestines, which takes the body longer to move food along. The longer the food sits within the intestines, the more time the body has to absorb its nutrients needed to grow a healthy baby. Unfortunately, this can lead to constipation. The best ways to avoid constipation is by increasing your fiber intake, drinking plenty of water (around 2-3Ls a day) and by doing regular exercise.

Make healthy choices during your pregnancy. Your baby’s health is directly related to what you eat before, during and after pregnancy. Nutrition is key to a healthy pregnancy and birth and is the biggest and most valuable tool you have for avoiding discomforts and complications, such as nausea and vomiting, heartburn, leg cramps, high blood pressure and swelling. Overall, healthy moms have healthy babies.

Think quality over quantity. Nutrition is one of the only things you have complete control over. So make every bite count. Eat nutrient rich, organic whole foods whenever possible. Avoid processed and refined foods, artificial sweeteners and preservatives. This is important throughout, but especially during the first trimester, as many women will experience ‘morning sickness’, (which by the way is another myth, morning sickness can occur at ANY time of the day!) where it may be difficult stomach a lot of food. If you are throwing up, you want to be sure that the food you are getting is the best it can be, and full of all the vitamins and minerals you need for your baby.

It is normal to gain between 25-35lbs during pregnancy, but remember that weight gain is individual. If you start off with a BMI (body mass index) slightly lower than average, you may find your put on a little extra weight-don’t be alarmed! We put on weight for a reason, and it is normal. Do not try to diet or loose weight whilst pregnant. It is dangerous and can lead to a number of complications. Also, don’t expect the weight to just fall off once you’ve given birth. Although breastfeeding does help to loose some of the weight put on during pregnancy, our body does still need additional calories and weight whilst nursing. Be kind to yourself. Remember that the pregnancy weight took 9 months to put on, and it is perfectly acceptable for it to take 9 months, if not longer, for you to return to your normal weight again. Unfortunately, our bodies don’t just ping back in to shape the moment we give birth. Don’t be put off by stories of celebrities or even friends, returning to their pre-pregnancy skinny jeans 3 days after stepping foot outside of the hospital doors! This is not a reality, and we should not adopt these unrealistic expectations. It is not healthy for anyone!

Myth number 2 ‘fats will make you fat’ is another common misconception, not just in pregnancy but in general too. Avoiding fats will not stop you from gaining weight. Gaining weight is inevitable during pregnancy. In fact eating the right kinds of fats will actually help you burn fat, control your moods, and fight fatigue.

For years nutritionists and doctors have preached from the low-fat bible, claiming that cutting fats will aid weight loss, prevent heart disease and manage cholesterol. But eliminating fats entirely from our diets is not the answer. In our culture we are obsessed with fat-free, dairy-free and low-fat alternatives, we forget that certain amounts of fat are essential for our bodies to function effectively. Fats are crucial for the nervous system and the development of the baby’s brain. It is not about the total amount of fat in our diet, it is about the type of fat that we eat. We have to remember that not all fats are equal.

A walk through the aisles of Albertsons or Ralphs provides us with many supposedly ‘guilt free’ alternatives: Fat free ice cream, low fat candies, cookie and cakes. When you come to browse the shelves for milk, for example, it is pretty hard to come across a carton of whole, or full fat milk. The array of low-fat and fat-free alternatives are all around us, but they do not take the importance of essential milk fatty acids and fat-soluble vitamins (A & D) in to consideration. Today most people think they are doing a good thing by drinking low-fat milk, but most of these commercial milk products are completely deficient of these vital nutrients. These products are marketed to our nation’s insecurities surrounding body image and weight gain. The low-fat label is a marketing tool, and a good one at that. One that’s had us fooled for many decades. If you think about it another way, 2% milk still has a very low fat content-2%-that’s 98% fat free!

The truth is, pregnancy is not the time to be doing fat-free anything. Don’t get me wrong, I’m not advocating bingeing on nothing but cheesey fries with lashings of ranch dressing, Twinkies and chocolate sundaes, but the key is seeking out the ‘good’ fats. Ones which really are healthy for us. It is about cutting out the bad fats and replacing them with healthier choices to promote optimum health.

Remember what your mother always told you, ‘You are what you eat’.

 

Click here for my Top Tips for a Healthy Pregnancy Diet

‘Pre-pregnancy diet affects health of future offspring’-Science Daily, July 4th 2011

Eating Habits Programmed During Infancy-Healthy Child Healthy World

Torrance Memorial Medical Centre, CA, Now Supporting VBAC Deliveries

This is a fantastic step in the right direction along the road to normalizing natural birth for women in the South Bay area. Women attending Torrance Memorial, now have the opportunity to a vaginal birth after [a previous] cesarean (VBAC). This is excellent news, as currently the c/section rate at this hospital stands at 40% (almost 10% higher than the national average), meaning, all of those women now don’t automatically have to undergo a repeat cesarean section a second or third time around. Previously, women who wanted a natural birth following a c/section would have to travel to a Westside facility. Now women have the choice they deserve.

“Women would have to leave the area and travel to have a vaginal birth, which is a big problem,” said Patricia Grube, the South Bay representative of the International Cesarean Awareness Network (ICAN). “For myself and many women, this is a positive development all around.”

Click here to read the article…